Stories of Potential

Christian Thomas: Zen & The Art of Healing

Christianna
McCausland
December 2, 2014
One patient’s journey from diagnosis to top of the dojo

Christian Thomas

Journey to Safety

Jenn
Lynn
August 1, 2014
A mother’s emotional journey to find help for her son with autism leads her to Kennedy Krieger Schools.

JacobThe year my son was in the third grade, I didn’t eat. I never left my phone, even to take a shower. Jake, who has autism, was scared to go to school and totally unhinged once he got there—running in circles, biting his hand, melting down. Desks would fly if one thing went wrong.

Autographs

November 12, 2013
Special education teacher Katie Cascio is inspired by a student who comes into his own at Kennedy Krieger High School.

DeVant Capers with his teacher, Katie CascioI was lucky enough to meet DeVante—a shy, reserved student with autism spectrum disorder—during my first year as an assistant teacher at Kennedy Krieger High School.

Getting Her Voice... Again

by Suzanne
Prestwich, MD
November 2, 2012

Many of the children admitted to the inpatient rehabilitation unit at Kennedy Krieger have experienced a trauma or illness that resulted in needing a procedure called a tracheostomy. The procedure involves placing a tube in a patient’s neck to help with breathing, but the downside is that it robs the patient of the ability to speak.

Alexandra's Story

Lauren
Manfuso
June 19, 2012
For Alexandra Carter, the Brightside Down Syndrome Mentoring Program is an opportunity to make friends and have fun.

Alexandra CarterAlexandra Carter doesn't lack for social skills. In fact, unlike many teenagers with Down syndrome who may struggle to find their places among social groups and peers, Alexandra is outgoing and vivacious.

Ben's Story

July 8, 2011
What happened next would change Ben’s life forever, and no one could possibly have seen it coming.

Ben's StoryIt was a perfect day at the beach. The sun was shining, and the water was just right. Ben and his friends splashed in the waves and built sand castles, while his mom Joanne and the other parents chatted under the umbrellas, keeping a watchful eye on the children. But as the day came to a close, everyone headed back to the house, just a few blocks away.

Khai's Story

Tapping into Khai's learning style

"Come here, I want to show you something," Khai Walker calls upstairs to his father. His fingers flash across a video game controller as he maneuvers a pixilated basketball player down the court. His father, Kenith, sticks his head into the room and Khai, with a few precise key strokes, guides the player through an aerial spin and perfect slam dunk.

"Nobody can beat him at his games," says his mom, Jacqueline.

Lily's Story

Lily WilkinsonWhen Lily Wilkinson was three, her neck was broken in an automobile accident leaving her paralyzed below the waist. A moment of screeching tires and crumpling metal, and her new life appeared etched in stone before she had ever entered kindergarten. After months of intensive care, her parents were told she would never be able to use or feel her legs again.

The Road to Discovery

Courtney
McGrath
High School Student Shines in Demanding Museum Job

Seth JacksonIt seemed like a perfect opportunity: a work-based internship at a highly regarded children's museum. Chosen students would perform administrative tasks, prepare supplies for crafts projects and, most importantly, help children and families visiting the museum make their way through a variety of exciting exhibits.

Cameron's Story

As 6-year-old Cameron Mott sings and dances her way around her family's North Carolina living room, it's obvious she has some serious star power. But things weren't always this way. At age three she started having seizures and was diagnosed with cortical dysplasia, an abnormality in the development of the cerebral cortex.

"She was having six to 10 seizures a day," says her dad, Casey. The seizures robbed Cameron's family of their little girl. Every morning she was clear and bright, but then the first seizure would hit. Cameron would lose consciousness and fall to the floor.

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