Letter from Our President

June 19, 2012

Dr. Gary GoldsteinAt Kennedy Krieger Institute, we do far more than treat patients -- through our research, patient care, professional training, and community involvement, we strive to improve the lives of the patients, students, and families we serve. For three quarters of a century, Kennedy Krieger Institute's highly trained interdisciplinary team of professionals has worked together to provide the best care possible to the individuals who trust us with their well-being and success.

In this issue of Potential, we're highlighting how we use our specialized understanding of a child's brain and nervous system to provide services that our patients, students, and families can't find anywhere else. Take Aidan Fielding. After a devastating concussion left him wondering whether he'd ever succeed on the soccer field and in the classroom again, our Neurorehabilitation Concussion Clinic helped him safely recover and get back in the game -- both athletically and academically.

Then there's Megan Miceli. When other doctors couldn't find an explanation for her developmental delays, her parents turned to Kennedy Krieger for the expertise and insight needed to find answers and eventually diagnose her with a genetic disorder so rare, only six documented cases exist in the world. Through Kennedy Krieger, the Miceli family found the support, comfort, and guidance that have helped Megan -- now 3 years old -- get the services and testing she needs to succeed throughout childhood and on into adulthood.

Next, keep reading to learn how 25 years ago, our Therapeutic Foster Care program gave a young boy with cancer a second chance at life and the support he needed to achieve his potential. Today, Carl Price is paying it forward by mentoring other foster children with trauma and medically fragile conditions.

All of these stories demonstrate our commitment to help patients, students, and families achieve their full potential. For 75 years we have worked to make the world a better place for individuals with developmental disorders and injuries. As we reflect back, we are inspired to continue to advance the field of developmental disabilities as we look to the future and its possibilities.

Thank you,
Gary W. Goldstein, M.D.