The comparative effects of remifentanil or magnesium sulfate versus placebo on attenuating the hemodynamic responses after electroconvulsive therapy.

TitleThe comparative effects of remifentanil or magnesium sulfate versus placebo on attenuating the hemodynamic responses after electroconvulsive therapy.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
Authorsvan Zijl DH, Gordon PC, James MF
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume101
Issue6
Pagination1651-5
Date Published2005 Dec
Abstract

In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we compared the effects of remifentanil or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) versus placebo in attenuating the sympathetic response to electroconvulsive therapy. Twenty adults underwent a total of 115 anesthetics for therapeutic electroconvulsive therapy. Patients were randomly allocated twice into each of the three test groups: placebo control, MgSO4 30 mg/kg, or remifentanil 1.0 microg/kg. Systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressures, heart rate, and oxygen saturations were recorded before IV access was established. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental 4 mg/kg. The trial drug was then administered and neuromuscular blockade was followed with succinylcholine 0.5 mg/kg before electroconvulsive therapy was performed. All measurements were repeated at 0, 1, 3 and 10 min after the seizure ended. Remifentanil and MgSO4 produced a statistically significant attenuation of the increase in systolic arterial blood pressure at 0, 1, and 3 min (P < 0.05). Remifentanil, but not MgSO4 or placebo, attenuated the increase in heart rate at 1 and 3 min but not the peak rate. Remifentanil increased the duration of apnea (mean 90 s), with no other adverse respiratory effects. Mean seizure duration time was 33 (+/- 14) s, with no difference among the groups. In conclusion, remifentanil 1.0 microg/kg and MgSO4 30 mg/kg attenuated the systolic arterial blood pressure response to electroconvulsive therapy without reducing the duration of seizure activity. Because MgSO4 has less effect on HR, it might offer advantages over remifentanil in patients at risk for post-electroconvulsive therapy bradycardia.

DOI10.1017/S1751731107710273
Alternate JournalAnesth. Analg.