Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on Spore Core Components and DNA Repair, with Minor Effects of Oxygen Radical Detoxification.

TitleResistance of Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on Spore Core Components and DNA Repair, with Minor Effects of Oxygen Radical Detoxification.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMoeller R, Raguse M, Reitz G, Okayasu R, Li Z, Klein S, Setlow P, Nicholson WL
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume80
Issue1
Pagination104-9
Date Published2014 Jan
Abstract

The roles of various core components, including α/β/γ-type small acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP), dipicolinic acid (DPA), core water content, and DNA repair by apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to different types of ionizing radiation including X rays, protons, and high-energy charged iron ions have been studied. Spores deficient in DNA repair by NHEJ or AP endonucleases, the oxidative stress response, or protection by major α/β-type SASP, DPA, and decreased core water content were significantly more sensitive to ionizing radiation than wild-type spores, with highest sensitivity to high-energy-charged iron ions. DNA repair via NHEJ and AP endonucleases appears to be the most important mechanism for spore resistance to ionizing radiation, whereas oxygen radical detoxification via the MrgA-mediated oxidative stress response or KatX catalase activity plays only a very minor role. Synergistic radioprotective effects of α/β-type but not γ-type SASP were also identified, indicating that α/β-type SASP's binding to spore DNA is important in preventing DNA damage due to reactive oxygen species generated by ionizing radiation.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0076614
Alternate JournalAppl. Environ. Microbiol.