Silica decorated TiO2 for virus inactivation in drinking water--simple synthesis method and mechanisms of enhanced inactivation kinetics.

TitleSilica decorated TiO2 for virus inactivation in drinking water--simple synthesis method and mechanisms of enhanced inactivation kinetics.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLiga MV, Maguire-Boyle SJ, Jafry HR, Barron AR, Li Q
JournalEnvironmental science & technology
Volume47
Issue12
Pagination6463-70
Date Published2013 Jun 18
Abstract

A new method of modifying TiO2 photocatalysts with SiO2 is developed in which SiO2 nanoparticles are simply mixed with TiO2 in water under ambient conditions. This method does not require the use of toxic solvents or significant energy input. Although the SiO2 modification slightly reduces hydroxyl free radical production, the composite SiO2-TiO2 nanomaterials have markedly higher photocatalytic inactivation rates for a common surrogate virus, bacteriophage MS2 (up to 270% compared to the unmodified TiO2), due to the greatly improved adsorptive density and dark inactivation of MS2. The Langmuir isotherm describes the adsorption data well and shows that the TiO2 modified with 5% SiO2 has a maximum adsorption density qmax 37 times that of the unmodified TiO2. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood model fits the photocatalytic inactivation kinetic data well. The SiO2-TiO2 material produces a greater maximum initial inactivation rate yet a lower intrinsic surface reaction rate constant, consistent with the reduced hydroxyl radical production and enhanced adsorption. These results suggest that modifying photocatalyst surface to increase contaminant adsorption is an important strategy to improve photocatalytic reaction efficiency. Simple and cheap synthesis methods such as that used in this study bring photocatalysis closer to being a viable water treatment option.

DOI10.1073/pnas.1300968110
Alternate JournalEnviron. Sci. Technol.