Motion Analysis Laboratory

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Kennedy Krieger Institute Names Dr. Amy J. Bastian as First Chief Science Officer

May 7, 2015
Bastian to identify new directions and research opportunities to help children and young adults with developmental disorders and injuries.

BALTIMORE, MD – Amy J. Bastian, Ph.D., a neuroscientist who serves as Director of Kennedy Krieger’s Motion Analysis Lab, has been chosen as the Institute’s first Chief Science Officer. Bastian is charged with identifying new directions and opportunities to facilitate the next generation of the Institute’s groundbreaking scientific efforts to find preventions and cures for disorders of the developing brain, spinal cord and musculoskeletal system.

The Neuroscience of Movement

December 2, 2014
How brain stimulation post-injury can affect learning and recovery

Motion Analysis Laboratory

Every movement you make—walking, reaching for your keys, or writing your name—is carefully orchestrated by hundreds of millions of neurons in the brain, with barely a conscious thought. But when a brain injury occurs, a person’s ability to move may become impaired. A once effortless movement may now seem impossible.

Discovery Shows Cerebellum Plays Important Role In Sensing Limb Position And Movement

September 4, 2013
Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers find that damage to the cerebellum impairs ability to predict motion outcomes and discrimination between limb positions.

Baltimore, Md. -- Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today study findings showing, for the first time, the link between the brain’s cerebellum and proprioception, or the body’s ability to sense movement and joint and limb position.

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Shown to Impact Walking Patterns

June 1, 2012
Kennedy Krieger researchers believe tool has potential to help patients relearn to walk after brain injury

Baltimore, MD -- In a step towards improving rehabilitation for patients with walking impairments, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum, an area of the brain known to be essential in adaptive learning, helped healthy individuals learn a new walking pattern more rapidly. The findings suggest that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be a valuable therapy tool to aid people relearning how to walk following a stroke or other brain injury.

Alternating Training Improves Motor Learning

October 18, 2011
Kennedy Krieger researchers find that varying practice sessions may benefit people with motor disorders

(Baltimore, MD) -- Learning from one's mistakes may be better than practicing to perfection, according to a new study appearing in the October 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that forcing people to switch from a normal walking pattern to an unusual one -- and back again -- made them better able to adjust to the unusual pattern the following day. The findings may help improve therapy for people relearning how to walk following stroke or other injury.