Letter from Our President

President's Message

Gary W. Goldstein, MDReading: More than any other subject, it is key to our livelihoods and success in life. Much emphasis is placed on developing reading skills in children at an early age but research shows that even children who were proficient at reading in the primary grades can slip and struggle in adolescence and beyond.

President's Message

June 3, 2011
The development of language skills is an integral part of a child’s ability to forge bonds with others. But between 10 and 30 percent of children develop speech and/or language delays. Left untreated, these delays can compromise a child’s social, academic and behavioral skills.

President's Message

June 3, 2011
In June, Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Career and Technology Center graduated its largest class of students yet – 17 young men and women, who despite enormous personal challenges, are looking forward to bright futures ahead.

President's Message

June 3, 2011
Spring is a time for growth and maturity. With love, patience and ample nurturing, children with special needs can fulfill their possibility. At Kennedy Krieger Institute, the seeds for success are planted all year around, so that children may bloom into self-assured, self-loving individuals.

President's Message

June 3, 2011
It’s difficult for any child to thrive without a stable home, but for a child with a disability, it’s practically impossible. Raising children with special needs means frequent visits to medical and psychological specialists, regular appointments with therapists, constant interaction with the school system and managing complicated prescription needs and medical equipment.

President's Message

June 3, 2011
Reading: More than any other subject, it is key to our livelihoods and success in life. Much emphasis is placed on developing reading skills in children at an early age – but research shows that even children who were proficient at reading in the primary grades can slip and struggle in adolescence and beyond. In fact, a recent study revealed that a startling 70 percent of eighth graders in the United States cannot read at a proficient level.

Letter from our President

The understanding and treatment of developmental disabilities have come a long way over the past century. As we reflect on the last 70 years since the founding of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, the past is not always bright, but there are people and moments that stand out as beacons of progress. President John F. Kennedy worked passionately to pass landmark legislation that forever changed the field of developmental disabilities for the better. But as we look forward, we can see that there is still much work to be done in our institutions, schools, and communities.

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