Program Spotlight

Bringing It All Home

Bringing It All HomeHaving a child with special needs often makes parents feel as though they are spending their lives driving from one specialist to another, trapped in waiting rooms, and filling out forms. It was no different for John and Amy Thompson. Their son Jake was diagnosed with Rasmussen's syndrome, a brain disorder that causes seizures.

No Hablo Inglés: Helping Spanish-Speaking Families with Special Needs

Primeros PasosBuenos días. Gracias por llamar al Kennedy Krieger Institute. ¿Cómo le puedo ayudar?

If the line of text above is confusing, imagine living in a world where every word, every conversation is a mystery. Imagine needing services but not being able to access them because you don't speak the language.

Making the Grade: SHNIC Helps Teachers Learn About Special Needs

Making the GradeBryan's teachers were at a loss for how to help him when he hid under his desk or back in the cubby area and cried. They knew he had been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; dysgraphia, a learning disability that affects writing abilities; and Asperger syndrome, but they didn't know how to deal with those diagnoses or what the best ways to teach him were.

Flying High on Life

Tania R.
Edghill
Kennedy Krieger Researcher Helps Implement Substance Abuse Prevention Programs Targeting Preschoolers in Baltimore

Peggy McNally at Dayspring Early Head Start CenterEvery morning, 3-year-old La'Nell Alewine and her 4-year-old sister, Ja'Nell, get dressed and make their way to preschool at the Dayspring Head Start Center in East Baltimore. There, the girls eat a healthy breakfast, play with their classmates and learn about the alphabet, colors and numbers.

Finding Their Comfort Zone

Sande
Riesett
Kennedy Krieger's Pediatric Psychology Clinic Helps Calm Children's Fears of Medical Procedures by Teaching Them What to Expect, What to Do, and How to Relax

Sam SpringLast year, 5-year-old Samuel Spring came to Kennedy Krieger Institute for evaluation of autism. The genetic and metabolic tests he was to undergo required giving a blood sample. When the nurse tried to tie the tourniquet around his arm in preparation for the needle stick, Sam began to cry and break away. His behavior made it difficult for the nurse to draw his blood.

The Art of Healing

Courtney
McGrath
Art and Music Therapy Give Kids with Disabilities an Outlet for Their Thoughts and Emotions

Not everyone can create a masterpiece of art or music, poetry or dance a gift like that is all the more special because it is rare. But the process of creating art is a gift unto itself, empowering and life enhancing. For children with disabilities, art can be especially valuable in helping them communicate thoughts and feelings that might otherwise stay locked inside or end up expressed in inappropriate ways.

Feels Like Home

Courtney
McGrath
Foster Care Program Becomes Gateway to Adoption for Children with Special Needs

Davona MillerJim Schuyler had a big decision to make last February. Diane Stegman, one of the Program Coordinators for the Therapeutic Family Care program, wanted to know whether he and his wife, Karen, could manage to care for one more child. That day, caseworkers from the Department of Social Services had removed Dante,* a 2-year-old boy with spina bifida, from a home where his needs could not be met.

Tender Loving Care

Courtney
McGrath
Daycare Fills Gap in Services for Children with Special Medical Needs

Children at World of CareFor parents of children with special medical needs, returning to the workforce is often a necessity, not an option. They need the income and health benefits a job provides. But finding quality childcare can be nearly impossible.

A School of Real World Experiences

Elizabeth
Heubeck
Unique Work-Based Learning program of the Career and Technology Center Results in Graduates Who Are Highly Qualified to Get, Keep Jobs

High School Students Ebony Wilkens and Larry BruceAcross the country, young adults preparing to enter the workforce are feeling the sting of a tight job market. Competition for employment is stiff for the brightest, most talented youth, much less young adults with learning, emotional and neurological problems.

Making the Grade

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Clinic Evaluates College-Aged Students with Learning Disorders

As soon as Joshua Fine reached pre-school, his mother Kathleen noticed that he learned differently from his older brother. As he picked up his ABCs and began trying to piece words together, Josh often reversed the order of his letters. This tendency continued as Josh began elementary school, but never reached a crisis point. Although Josh frequently refused to read, his grades stayed adequate. But Kathleen harbored nagging suspicions that her son wasn't reaching his full academic potential.

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