Program Spotlight

Balancing Act

Courtney
McGrath
Cranial-Cervical Clinic Focuses on Prevention and Treatment of Head Tilts and Malformations

Little Eric Miller* had a rough start in life. Struggling with severe acid reflux from the time he was just a few days old, he spent much of his first few months shuttling from one doctor to another, enduring countless X-rays, CT scans and other tests. Mom Brenda Baker*, desperate to relieve his discomfort, decided to keep him propped up as much as possible, even putting him in his car seat to sleep. She began to notice that his head seemed larger than normal and tilted to the right.

Healing from Trauma

Tania Edgehill
Baker
The Family Center's Clinical Initiatives Help Children Recover from Trauma

Healing from TraumaEach year, more than 900,000 children in the United States experience physical or sexual abuse, community or domestic violence, neglect or abandonment. Many of these traumatic incidents occur within the caregiving system that is supposed to protect children.

Sense-ational Success

Susan
Shaffer
Multi-Sensory Environment Helps Children with Autism Reach Therapeutic and Educational Goals

Ian Wright with Therapist Kathryn WolfeImagine a room filled with soothing music, where swirls of color dance around the walls, rich scents fill the air and chairs vibrate in time with the music you've chosen. Welcome to the multi-sensory environment (MSE), a room that heightens sensory experience and awareness, induces relaxation, relieves anxiety and promotes interaction and learning.

A Grateful Gift

Daniel
Valentine
A family's generosity helps advance care for hundreds of children and adults with spina bifida

The Keelty FamilyLess than 24 hours after he was born, Philip Keelty had his first major surgery an operation to repair the hole in his spinal column that defines his birth disorder, spina bifida.

Helping Hands

Courtney
McGrath
Innovative Program Encourages Children to Develop Their Weaker Limbs

When you first look at Brianna Robinson, you might not realize that she has cerebral palsy. She does a lot of the same things most other 2 1/2-year-old girls do: she walks and runs, plays with dolls and eagerly reaches for favorite treats. But look closer and you notice that while Brianna enjoys a lot of the same games and activities as other kids her age, she tends to do them with just one hand. The type of cerebral palsy Brianna has causes hemiplegia, in which one side of the body is weaker and less coordinated than the other.

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