Stories of Potential

Short Circuits

Tania R.
Edghill
January 31, 2006
Kennedy Krieger Researcher Uses Innovations in MRI Technology to Study the Brain's Structure and Function in Search of the Cause of ADHD

Erin Blitz with Dr. Stewart MostofskyLaurie Blitz began to suspect that something was not quite right with her daughter as early as when she was a toddler. Erin seemed overly hyperactive, moving so much that even simple tasks like changing her diaper became lessons in patience and control. When she was old enough to walk, she would constantly run away, placing herself in danger.

Crowning Glory

Therapeutic Horseback Riding Leads Kennedy Krieger Patient to A Golden Opportunity

Erin StrevigOnce a week, 19-year-old Erin Strevig can be found riding horses near her home in Westminster. Born with a rare genetic condition known as Williams syndrome, she has difficulty doing many of the things that typically developing teenagers can do with ease, such as walking and talking.

Flying High on Life

Tania R.
Edghill
Kennedy Krieger Researcher Helps Implement Substance Abuse Prevention Programs Targeting Preschoolers in Baltimore

Peggy McNally at Dayspring Early Head Start CenterEvery morning, 3-year-old La'Nell Alewine and her 4-year-old sister, Ja'Nell, get dressed and make their way to preschool at the Dayspring Head Start Center in East Baltimore. There, the girls eat a healthy breakfast, play with their classmates and learn about the alphabet, colors and numbers.

Finding Their Comfort Zone

Sande
Riesett
Kennedy Krieger's Pediatric Psychology Clinic Helps Calm Children's Fears of Medical Procedures by Teaching Them What to Expect, What to Do, and How to Relax

Sam SpringLast year, 5-year-old Samuel Spring came to Kennedy Krieger Institute for evaluation of autism. The genetic and metabolic tests he was to undergo required giving a blood sample. When the nurse tried to tie the tourniquet around his arm in preparation for the needle stick, Sam began to cry and break away. His behavior made it difficult for the nurse to draw his blood.

Feels Like Home

Courtney
McGrath
Foster Care Program Becomes Gateway to Adoption for Children with Special Needs

Davona MillerJim Schuyler had a big decision to make last February. Diane Stegman, one of the Program Coordinators for the Therapeutic Family Care program, wanted to know whether he and his wife, Karen, could manage to care for one more child. That day, caseworkers from the Department of Social Services had removed Dante,* a 2-year-old boy with spina bifida, from a home where his needs could not be met.

Targeting Tumors

Courtney
McGrath
Research and Care Programs at Kennedy Krieger Work to Minimize the Damage Caused by Brain Cancer

Nicole BahenIf you've ever doubted how quickly your life can be turned upside down, just ask the Bahen family. On Monday, Nov. 14, 2000, the Bahens' 5-year-old daughter Nicole joined her friends for her usual afternoon dance class. By Sunday Nov. 20, Nicole lay in intensive care recovering from surgery, unable to speak, roll over or swallow, nearly paralyzed on her right side. Such is the swift devastation of a pediatric brain tumor.

A School of Real World Experiences

Elizabeth
Heubeck
Unique Work-Based Learning program of the Career and Technology Center Results in Graduates Who Are Highly Qualified to Get, Keep Jobs

High School Students Ebony Wilkens and Larry BruceAcross the country, young adults preparing to enter the workforce are feeling the sting of a tight job market. Competition for employment is stiff for the brightest, most talented youth, much less young adults with learning, emotional and neurological problems.

Standing Firmly on Two Feet

Julie
Lincoln
Boy Undergoes Dramatic Surgery, Therapy to Lengthen Short Limb

Tyler KiskisAt 5 years old, Tyler Kiskis is a bundle of energy, a little spark-plug with tossled brown hair and an impish grin who revels in the things that most 5-year-old boys do baseball and soccer, chasing the family Labrador, jumping through a water sprinkler in the front yard of his family's Pasadena home.

Making the Grade

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Clinic Evaluates College-Aged Students with Learning Disorders

As soon as Joshua Fine reached pre-school, his mother Kathleen noticed that he learned differently from his older brother. As he picked up his ABCs and began trying to piece words together, Josh often reversed the order of his letters. This tendency continued as Josh began elementary school, but never reached a crisis point. Although Josh frequently refused to read, his grades stayed adequate. But Kathleen harbored nagging suspicions that her son wasn't reaching his full academic potential.

Hands that Heal

Courtney
McGrath
Researchers at Kennedy Krieger Investigate Whether Energy Therapy Can Benefit Children with Developmental Disabilities

To an outsider, it looks like the small boy is having fun with a baby-sitter. As he moves from toy to toy, his "sitter" follows him, occasionally placing her hands on his arms and legs. She tries to touch his head, but he pushes her hand away. She spends a lot of time pressing lightly on his chest. When he gets tired, she keeps applying light pressure as he becomes more and more relaxed. As the boy starts to nod off, she steps back, ending the session.

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