Movement Disorders

Therapeutic Advanced Technology for Use Across the Lifespan

Nov 7 2014 - 8:00am - 5:00pm

Kennedy Krieger institute
801 North Broadway
Room 202
Baltimore, MD 21205

Discovery Shows Cerebellum Plays Important Role In Sensing Limb Position And Movement

September 4, 2013
Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers find that damage to the cerebellum impairs ability to predict motion outcomes and discrimination between limb positions.

Baltimore, Md. -- Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today study findings showing, for the first time, the link between the brain’s cerebellum and proprioception, or the body’s ability to sense movement and joint and limb position.

The Spectrum of Developmental Disabilities XXXV: The Continuum of Motor Dysfunction

Mar 18 2013 (All day) - Mar 20 2013 (All day)

DESCRIPTION

The Spectrum of Developmental Disabilities activity will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the issues of motor dysfunction. This multidisciplinary course will review motor dysfunction, including epidemiology, genetic and neuroimaging issues, diagnostic overlaps, associated dysfunctions, evaluation and management, outcomes and future directions.

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Shown to Impact Walking Patterns

June 1, 2012
Kennedy Krieger researchers believe tool has potential to help patients relearn to walk after brain injury

Baltimore, MD -- In a step towards improving rehabilitation for patients with walking impairments, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum, an area of the brain known to be essential in adaptive learning, helped healthy individuals learn a new walking pattern more rapidly. The findings suggest that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be a valuable therapy tool to aid people relearning how to walk following a stroke or other brain injury.

Helping Hands

Courtney
McGrath
Innovative Program Encourages Children to Develop Their Weaker Limbs

When you first look at Brianna Robinson, you might not realize that she has cerebral palsy. She does a lot of the same things most other 2 1/2-year-old girls do: she walks and runs, plays with dolls and eagerly reaches for favorite treats. But look closer and you notice that while Brianna enjoys a lot of the same games and activities as other kids her age, she tends to do them with just one hand. The type of cerebral palsy Brianna has causes hemiplegia, in which one side of the body is weaker and less coordinated than the other.

New Research Discovers Independent Brain Networks Control Human Walking

August 7, 2007
Kennedy Krieger Institute Study Enhances Understanding of Brain Plasticity and Motor Skills, Signaling Advancements for Future Rehab Practices

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Dr. Arnold Capute, 'Father' of Developmental Pediatrics, Dies at Age 80

December 2, 2003
Capute's contributions to the field of developmental pediatrics are immeasurable

Baltimore- Dr. Arnold J. Capute, a faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for nearly forty years, died November 30 at age 80 from congestive heart failure. Dr. Capute devoted the majority of his career to increasing pediatricians' understanding of neurodevelopmental disabilities, and was instrumental in the creation of the field of Developmental Pediatrics, now called Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

Movement Disorders

To find patient care programs and faculty treating movement disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, as well as research investigating this disorder, please see the right-hand column below. Additional helpful information, including definitions, symptoms, Institute press releases, Potential magazine articles, and other resources outside the Institute, have also been provided for readers on this page.

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